Here are sketches of some of my latest research projects:

Epistemic Democracy

Network diagram of influence

Network diagram of influence

Are democratic forms of government justified because democracies are better at "tracking the truth" than any other conceivable form of government? To what extent can the aggregation of distributed information improve collective decision making, and does "the wisdom of crowds" exist? In joint research with Franz Dietrich, Bob Goodin and Christian List I investigate these questions. We are particularly interested in the applicability and limitations of the Condorcet Jury Theorem. Franz Dietrich and I also developed a set of new jury theorems with more realistic premises and conclusions. In 2016, Bob Goodin and I will finish our book "An Epistemic Theory of Democracy".

 

Self-Serving Biases and Social Moral Epistemology

From our experimental treatment

From our experimental treatment

How do individuals respond to social norms if what the norm demands depends on what they know about the situation? By strategically avoiding some and seeking other information, individuals are able to shape the normative context they operate in to their advantage. In joint experimental and theoretical work with Arne Weiss, I investigate the interaction between norms and knowledge acquisition. We find experimental evidence for strategic information uptake. We show in a formal model that one potential source of such strategic incentives is the relatively coarse definition of social norms.

 

Reversal of Fortunes

("Seven 5732852" by Niklas Morberg)

("Seven 5732852" by Niklas Morberg)

Why do we find lotteries fair when allocating indivisible goods to claimants with similar claims to the scarce good? In joint work with Alex Voorhoeve, I develop a new theory of lottery fairness. We argue that the fairness of lotteries partly depends on the reasons it can provide to the loser of the allocation process.